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STL on the Air 📻

After decades of raw sewage floods, Illinois pledges $21 million to fix the problem

2 days 15 hours ago
In the Metro East city of Cahokia Heights, sewer and stormwater systems are often so full that raw sewage seeps into residents’ yards. The city has experienced chronic flooding for two decades, but on August 3, Illinois announced it would spend $21 million to finally fix the problem. Reacting to the news, we hear from resident Sheila Gladney and researcher José Constantine, an assistant professor of geosciences at Williams College.

STL Fringe Fest returns for their 11th year spotlighting local artists

2 days 15 hours ago
STL Fringe Fest spotlights stage acts that are far from the mainstream. In its 11th year, the festival boasts their largest playbill yet with over 40 acts scheduled in venues across St. Louis. St. Lou Fringe president and artistic director Matthew Kerns and comedian Mollie Ambrugey joins St. Louis on the Air to discuss the importance of uplifting local indie artists as audiences and performers return to theaters.

FEMA arrives in a flooded St. Louis

2 days 15 hours ago
The floodwaters may be gone, but residents in the St. Louis region are still picking up the pieces after historic flooding in late July. In the weeks since, hundreds of flood victims were forced to wait hours at overcrowded aid centers. Now, more help is on the way: This week, teams from FEMA canvassed areas that were hit hard by extreme weather. STLPR reporter Jeremy Goodwin shares his observations from the first day of canvassing, and we hear from two flood victims about their needs as they wait for more resources.

As Costco nears completion, eminent domain looms over University City residents

1 week 2 days ago
For years, residents in University City believed a $190 million development wouldn’t force them to sell their homes through eminent domain. But in June, that’s exactly what developer Larry Chapman requested from the city council. Now, residents like Nichole Angieri are wondering if their homes are next. Bob’s Seafood founder Bob Mepham also joins the show to discuss how the same developer used eminent domain to close his business.

How early Egyptologists formed 'small, ephemeral communities'

1 week 4 days ago
The study of ancient Egypt flourished in the late 1880s as archaeologists and historians sought to study the artifacts and tombs left behind. These early Egyptologists gathered in hotels to discuss what they found, creating “small, ephemeral communities,” writes Missouri University of Science and Technology history professor Kate Sheppard, who discusses her research and new book, “Tea on the Terrace.”

How early Egyptologists formed 'small, ephemeral communities

1 week 4 days ago
The study of ancient Egypt flourished in the late 1880s as archaeologists and historians sought to study the artifacts and tombs left behind. These early Egyptologists gathered in hotels to discuss what they found, creating “small, ephemeral communities,” writes Missouri University of Science and Technology history professor Kate Sheppard, who discusses her research and new book, “Tea on the Terrace.”

Record breaking rainfall, flash flood leaves St. Louisans scrambling for aid

2 weeks 4 days ago
St. Louis broke the record for the most rainfall ever recorded in a single day in the city on July 26. One person died. Hundreds of people, including Hazelwood resident Camila Cage, were rescued by first responders Tuesday morning. Cage joined St. Louis on the Air to discuss what she experienced as the waters rose. Also, St. Louis Public Radio reporter Sarah Fentem provided an update on the effects of the storm.

Anti-abortion organizers prepare for post-Roe realities in Missouri and Illinois

3 weeks 1 day ago
Two local anti-abortion advocates heralded the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. But they say their work isn’t done even though abortions are illegal in almost all instances in Missouri. This conversation follows one earlier in the week with two abortion rights supporters. Editor’s Note: The guests claimed that “contraceptives can cause what’s called abortifacients,” a drug that causes an abortion. That’s not true. Contraceptives, including Plan B, do not cause an abortion. They prevent fertilization. Pregnancy only occurs when a fertilized egg has been implanted in the wall of the uterus. A guest also claimed that “for a woman to take contraception of any form, it is not healthy for her.” The medical community agrees that while there are some risks associated with birth control, “all methods of contraception are considered okay for healthy women.”

Women Missouri State Senators work across the aisle to improve childhood literacy

3 weeks 2 days ago
The ability to read is fundamental to learning in all school subjects and every aspect of life. However, Missouri’s kids are ranked below 19 other states in fourth grade reading level. State Sen. Jill Schupp joined St. Louis on the Air to discuss what she and her fellow women State Senators are doing to support students that are struggling in reading, as well as a new children’s book she co-authored with every woman State Senator in Missouri’s history.

Anti-abortion organizers prepare for post-Roe realities in Missouri and Illinois

3 weeks 2 days ago
Two local anti-abortion advocates heralded the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. But they say their work isn’t done even though abortions are illegal in almost all instances in Missouri. This conversation follows one earlier in the week with two abortion rights supporters. Editor’s Note: The guests claimed that “contraceptives can cause what’s called abortifacients,” a drug that causes an abortion. That’s not true. Contraceptives, including Plan B, do not cause an abortion. They prevent fertilization. Pregnancy only occurs when a fertilized egg has been implanted in the wall of the uterus. A guest also claimed that “for a woman to take contraception of any form, it is not healthy for her.” The medical community agrees that while there are some risks associated with birth control, “all methods of contraception are considered okay for healthy women.”

A St. Louis cop's 'reckless' detective work put innocent men in jail. He can’t be sued.

3 weeks 4 days ago
On this month’s Legal Roundtable, attorneys Eric Banks, Brenda Talent and Sarah Swatosh tackle three fresh rulings from 8th Circuit Court of Appeals that all concern the ways “qualified immunity” can protect government officials from being sued. The attorneys also dig into the impact of Missouri’s abortion laws, the new (and fiercely disputed) Homer G. Phillips hospital, and more. Sarah Fenske returns as guest host.

Reproductive freedom, abolition and trans rights are all entwined, organizers say

3 weeks 5 days ago
In the wake of the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, abortion rights organizers in St. Louis are working hard to disrupt the momentum of the anti-abortion movement. In this episode, Kennedy Moore from Pro-Choice Missouri and Brianna Chandler from WashU discuss how the reproductive freedom movement, abolition, climate justice, and trans rights are all enmeshed and how their work aims to empower people to take action.

Fluffy GRL returns to St. Louis with pool party and empowerment

3 weeks 6 days ago
Ten years after the first “Fluffy GRL summit,” Ebbi Nichole’s Fluffy GRL Movement continues to uplift body positivity... and having fun while doing it. Nichol discusses her founding of the movement, the rampant “miseducation” around body sizes, and next month’s “GRL Weekend” and pool party in St. Louis.

Tacos La Jefa takes center stage in 'We Live Here Auténtico!'

3 weeks 6 days ago
Tacos La Jefa is in St. Louis' Dutchtown neighborhood. The family restaurant was the subject of a recent episode of St. Louis Public Radio's podcast, "We Live Here Auténtico!" The podcast focuses on Latino culture and identity in St. Louis and beyond. This story begins with the matriarch of the Amezcua family, Heriberta Amezcua, also known as La Jefa, “the boss."